The forest

The forest

 

Those who work in mining, oil and energy corporations cannot see that the same mechanism that led to the Arab Spring risks forming a backlash against their own industries – along with many others. Government officials condemning the latest extremist outrage nevertheless cannot see that the reasons behind something like the 9/11 attack on the Twin Towers are very similar to why the general public holds politicians in low esteem and increasingly threatens a backlash against them.

Meanwhile, journalists indulging in a bit of Banker Bashing cannot see that financial institutions got into trouble for many of the same reasons as News Corporation did three years later – and that (along with politicians, the police and even the judiciary) the news media themselves currently risk far greater backlashes in the future. Likewise, Chinese and Indian businesses cannot see the associated causes between depleting water and the threats of structural backlashes that in the medium-term risk undermining their national economies.

And worldwide, key people cannot see that the crucial lesson to be learned from the United Nations’ inability to prevent certain species being hunted near extinction is that leaders throughout businesses, institutions and political organizations have a vested interest to rise to the challenge of fundamentally changing how their respective industries and institutions operate – before a major wave of backlashes forces far-less-attractive sanctions upon them anyway.